Blues Talkin' - Culture, Politics & Life

George Clinton Tells the Deal on Dope

“There’s more profit in pretending that we’re stopping it than selling it.” – Some medicine from Dr. Funkenstein.

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Rest In The Funk – Gil Scott-Heron

“You will not be able to stay home, brother. You will not be able to plug in, turn on and cop out. You will not be able to lose yourself on skag and skip out for beer during commercials, Because the revolution will not be televised.”

Gil Scott-Heron made his transition on Friday afternoon, May 27. He was 62 years old.

He is a Godfather of Hip Hop, and the father of socially, politically conscious and revolutionary minded poets, singers and musicians.

“Home is where I live inside my white powder dreams. Home was once an empty vacuum that’s filled now with my silent screams. Home is where the needle marks try to heal my broken heart, and it might not be such a bad idea if I never, if I never went home again.”

His best work challenged an often superficial, materialistic, uncaring America, while turning a light on the trials, tribulations, and triumphs of regular people.

“A rat done bit my sister, Nell, and whitey’s on the moon. Her face and arms began to swell, and whitey’s on the moon.”

Gil Scott-Heron is inspirational. His poetry, his songs are important because of his ability to frame complex political questions in simple everyday language.

Rest in the Funk, Gil Scott-Heron.

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Rest In The Funk – Mark Adams of Slave

Sad news… former Slave front man Steve Arrington just posted this on Twitter:

@Steve_Arrington: “My friend since high school has passed early this morning. The great Mark Adams bass player of Slave. I can’t believe it.”

Mark was the first member of the band most of us heard as the teenage bass prodigy kicked of their monster first single “Slide”. It was that funky bassline that propelled the song to the number 1 spot on the R&B charts.

Adams is underrated as a bass hero. His creative, rhythmic lines powered the Ohio group’s dynamic dancefloor-shaking Stellar Fungk.

Adams explained his approach in an interview with Bass Player Magazine: “I’ve been fortunate in Slave that the band has always given me space to be a melody instrument and to lead the groove. I talk through my bass and step forward like a lead singer riffing…”

I remember pulling out those old Slave records when I was first learning to play the bass. Adams’ work offers endless lessons in how to utilize the bass guitar as a lead instrument without getting in the way of the vocals and lyrics.

There’s no word yet on the cause of death, but our thoughts and prayers go out to the Slave family.

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